Tuesday, 4 November 2014

Dorridge parking restrictions agreed

PLANS to introduce a raft of parking restrictions in Dorridge will be brought in in phases, council bosses have announced.

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Solihull Metropolitan Borough Council had consulted on a range of parking measures around the village (see details here). For details of the final plans click here.

The agreed measures – including a 20mph limit through the centre and waiting restrictions - were aimed at tackling parking by commuters who leave their cars in the village all day.

Some 320 people responded to a consultation with about a third in favour and two-thirds against, the council said.

A statement released today said: “In August 2014, Solihull Council undertook a substantial consultation concerning a proposal to introduce new parking restrictions in Dorridge.

“After analysing the responses to the consultation and taking into account the general feelings expressed, a way forward has been agreed.

“The scheme will now be considered in a number of phases. The first phase will encompass the new development at the heart of the village and will included parking restrictions, a 20mph speed limit, loading and disabled parking facilities, and speed tables.

“The roads affected will be Station Approach, Forest Road and lengths of Station Road, Avenue Road and Grange Road, as well as the car park adjacent to the shops at the Arden Buildings.”

It comes as Sainsbury’s prepares to open a supermarket on the site of the former Forest Court on November 26.

“The effects of these new measures, together with changes to parking patterns influenced by the new Sainsburys development, will be monitored and more parking restrictions may be considered as a result.

“The community will be consulted again before any further restrictions are implemented.”

Cabinet member for transport and highways Ted Richards said: “We have consulted with the residents of Dorridge and the overwhelming feeling was that we should wait to see the effects of the new development before introducing wider parking restrictions.

“As new parking patterns settle and become established, we will monitor the area and see what other areas need specific attention. “



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37 comments:

  1. This seems a sensible approach and the commitment to further consultation is welcome - but what we need is more involvement. What about a public meeting where we could explore and help develop some options?

    I suspect the monitoring might need to be over a longer term and cover the whole area. I find it odd, for instance, that the bulk of Avenue Road is not to be formally monitored. At present people park only on the roadway and on the one side of Avenue Road which has a pavement. If parking is difficult or we get congestion in the central Dorridge area, I expect that people will park further out. In particular, I predict that people will park on both sides of Avenue Road making passing difficult and, increasingly, they will park on the pavement and grass verges.

    If the basic problem is that Dorridge attracts too many cars and there is not enough parking, shifting the problem from street to street will never provide a satisfactory solution and favours the convenience of visitors over the amenity of local residents.

    I'm sure, along with other Dorridge residents, I'll be doing 'monitoring' myself!



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  2. The problem won't go away if people need to park to go to dentists and hairdressers, they are not evil people coming from a strange land, they are your friends from Lapworth and Knowle and Rowington etc. using Dorridge, they can't walk or come by bus, so the answer is not the attitude to favouring STRANGERS over residents, the great British us and them attitude, they are the very people that are going to keep Dorridge centre alive, so it never get like it was before Sainsbury's came. The only answer is making the two car parks larger, and having parking charges after say two hours.

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    1. 10:43 agree.
      The ONLY reason why the previous development fell into disrepair was for the simple reason that the good people of Dorridge and surrounding areas decided not to shop there.

      More people use cars these days, and more people are commuting via Dorridge Station - so we need to provide places for them to park.

      Buses and other such things are great but pissing in the wind so far as making any real difference.

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  3. Glad the situation is being monitored. Gut feeling that making the 2 car parks larger is correct and a charge for long stay but will be interesting to see what happens once the store is open. There is building work behind houses on manor road which is causing parking issues and will continue to do so for a while.

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  4. This is exactly why this size of store was always inappropriate for a village centre the size of Dorridge, in fact for any VILLAGE centre. Now everyone wants to increase everything to fit the store where it should have been the other way around - an appropriately sized store fitting into the restricted centre that we have. Unless houses in Forest Road and parts of Avenue Road and Station Road are knocked down and the roadway is widened to accommodate more parking spaces, just putting additional storeys on top of car parks is always going to cause more and more trouble on the roads.
    This is also why the store should have been of an appropriate size to attract residents from Dorridge, Knowle, Bentley Heath and maybe Hockley Heath, there simply isn't the infrastructure to attract 'strangers' from Rowington, Lapworth etc.
    I'm surprised people haven't grasped this yet.

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    1. 13:16
      When forest court was busy and thriving, many years ago, it was a nightmare to park in Dorridge.
      If you read the data you will be the biggest increase in traffic has come from rail commuters; the recession has led to a big increase in people willing to travel to London in particular.
      I am surprised people haven't grasped this yet.

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  5. Having lived in Dorridge for 40 odd years, I am well aware of the problems of the awful parking problems. Sainsburys will not make a difference. It is providing more car park spaces, but they are the wrong kind of parking spaces. Remember, the old train " service" to London, the slam door diesels into town. We now have a superb service north and south and it is that, which is causing the problem. Chiltern and SMBC should have foreseen the problem and provided a " Parkway", the obvious place is the riding school, some people will object etc , but I cannot see any other solution. Look at the success of Warwick Parkway.
    The commuters would be happy, and Dorridge freed up.
    Just my pennies worth

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    1. The most sensible idea that I have heard in this whole saga. A wonderful example of thinking outside the box. Sadly whether it could ever happen or not is another question.

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    2. If you are meaning Solihull Riding Club, I don't fancy your chances. It is a wonderful place much loved by riders and dog walkers, a sanctuary amongst increasing suburban sprawl. Please leave this place with its trees and wildlife habitats alone.

      Dorridge was never meant to absorb so many travellers or shoppers, a classic case of town planning gone horribly wrong. It's about time someone in authority said ' enough is enough 'before the very village we all love is destroyed forever, if it isn't too late. Dorridge centre is not being revitalised. How many people are going to visit Dorridge to go shopping at the revitalised centre containing a Sainsbury's supermarket, a high street cafe and a shoe repairer - not particularly exciting is it. Disaster!
      It';s not a question of them and us. All Dorridge residents have the right to leave peacefully and safely and if that means there aren't enough parking spaces, that's just too bad! The planners should have thought about that when plans were approved for this ridiculous development.I feel sorry for those residents that will now find themselves unable to easily visit the doctor or other services in the village they call home.
      You reap what you sow!

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    3. Apology for typing error ......
      Obviously Dorridge residents have the right to live (or leave if they feel the need!!!) peacefully and safely ............

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    4. I agree entirely. At the original Planning meeting for Sainsburys, councillors spoke passionately about how much Solihull values its villages and must ensure they are protected. By the third meeting councillors appeared not to care a jot about Solihull's villages and willingly handed Dorridge over to Sainsburys to do their worst.

      On the face of it a Parkway at SRC seems an ideal solution, but who would pay for that and the club's grounds don't appear to be up for grabs.

      We will just have to wait and see how badly Sainsburys affects the traffic and parking situation. Planners believed that if people couldn't park they wouldn't come and Sainsburys were taking a risk building such a big store. I hope they are right, but if they are not the fallout could be devastating for all, particularly those who live closest and would suffer the most from heavy parking restrictions outside their homes.

      time will tell and Christmas will test Dorridge to the limits.

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  6. Good idea 17:08. That might even be the cheaper option. I just need to get to the Drs. and the Dentist and live too far away to walk. As things are going, I think the only way will be by taxi!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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  7. Someone told me that Sainsbury's are negotiating to build a multi-storey car park behind the church and in return the station is to be reamed 'Sainsburys Dorridge Parkway'.

    Not sure if it's true but no smoke without fire.

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  8. Negotiating with who?

    We should all be very positive and show whoever is responsible that our village identity is not for sale at any price.

    Sainsbury's have not done anything to show me that they deserve my support in any way whatsoever.

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  9. I think 13.53 was being making a 'humourous comment'. I would be delighted if they were doing something about the parking but its hardly they're problem as its a commuter issue.

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  10. "new parking spot in Dorridge"
    Drive into Station Approach, drive onto new bigger pavement outside corner take away, and use wide dropped kerb, so as not to damage suspension.

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  11. Just drove through Dorridge and there were 3 cars parked fully on various wide pavements. What is wrong with people?

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  12. yes, there were three there at 1930. A perfect parking space for the chippy, the take away, or the café. Provide a wide pavement and dropped kerb, and people will abuse it.

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  13. I wish people would stop bleating on about Dorridge being a "village"! It stopped being a Village when Four Ashes was built. A nail went in that coffin 20 years ago.

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  14. Despite the Four Ashes development, Dorridge is still, officially, very much a village. It;s just a pity that this new build makes the centre look like that of a Birmingham suburb.

    Question - why does the Dorridge Surgery website dispense Sainsbury;'s Dorridge Community newsletters?

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    1. 13:49
      Because its part of the community - just as they have the newsletters in the barbers, some hairdressers, and the train station (including in the front window) by ticket office.

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  15. Why not? The rebuild of the surgery was a commercial deal between the doctors and the supermarket group. The whole deal was funded by Sainsburys, they have the dominant position. As it is, we now have a wonderful new surgery, although I find it a little clinical and cold. AND, before anyone goes on about the doctors getting a free ride, forget it, there is no such thing as a free lunch, even in the NHS.

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  16. Just one question as you have raise the topic: Who OWNS the new surgery.
    Not who use it
    Not who benefits
    Just a simple who is/are the registered owners?

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  17. Haven't a clue, the ownership of parts of Dorridge have always been entwined with Muntz family. Who owns the freehold of the surgery? If the docs owned it, have they done a sale and lease back? It will all come out in the wash sometime. We have a new surgery, which should see me out.

    Back to the parking, have you noticed the length of the low kerb for the piazza. I am sure we will see many cars parked on the piazza, until the police enforce the law or bollards will have to put up. Did no one at council think this through?

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  18. Now there is an idea, a council that "thinks".

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  19. One thing that really bugs me is the name Sainsbury's Dorridge. Dorridge does not belong to Sainsbury's.

    The FaceBook page - headed up Sainsbury's Dorridge and the Sainsbury's Dorridge Community newsletter!!! are just a couple of examples.

    Sainsbury's is simply another supermarket nothing more, nothing less. Lets make sure we do not lose our identity along with everything else.

    As for the doctors, have no objection to copies of the newletters in the surgery but to have them all available for download on their website I find very strange and rather intrusive. I would have thought the best place for these would be the DDRA website.

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    1. DDRA, sponsored by Sainsbury's.

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    2. let's face it Sainsburys now owns the centre of Dorridge might as well rename it, paint it orange and stick a plastic bag on its head. you either love it or hate it but time will tell how successful it is. in a few years - if what we hear in the news is right - it could become another Forest court or even a Lidl or aldi.
      the facebook brigade has a lot to answer for

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    3. Sainsbury's are re-branding unsuccessful stores as Netto - keep up

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  20. Why does Sainsbury's Dorridge have to be an issue? it purely describes where it is located, just like Tesco's Monkspath. Doesn't mean it belongs to anyone!

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  21. The Muntz family still own the land. Sainsbury's and doctors have a lease which I believe has been extended.

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  22. The parking on manor road seems to be easing now that the no of builders is decreasing - though I guess there will be some problems caused near where they are building the cala homes off manor road. The Sainsbury's is justified as the are contiues to grow.

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  23. I have now written to the Council. This afternoon, at 1600hr there were two cars outside the takeaway on the pavement, one of which I have on good authority, is owned by the takeaway owner. Goodness knows what will happen when the main square is open.

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  24. Cars have been parked there every evening this week. Maybe the local police will be on the case.oh wait....
    Lots of empty coffee cups littering Poplar Road again today. I do hope we get a full time litter patrol...

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    1. DDRA to the rescue? I think not. Remember, they backed all this.

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  25. The parking on the new pavement will have to be policed firmly. Perhaps tonight on the big switch on,there will be a police prescence. I don't blame people parking there, when there is no where else to park; esp. if you are just popping to the chippy.

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  26. Are the council really monitoring the parking, I don't think so! Still bad commuter parking on Poplar Road.

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