Sunday, 2 November 2014

Dorridge Sainsbury's opening date announced

SAINSBURY'S Dorridge will open on Wednesday, November 26, the firm has announced.

Click the headline or link below to read the rest of this story.

Its latest community newsletter gives the date and says: "We are delighted to announce the above store opening date and are busy preparing for a great event on the morning of 26th November, when we open the doors at 9am.

"We are in our busiest phase now and we ask for your ongoing patience and co-operation.

"However, we are extremely pleased with the progress of construction and all the fantastic feedback we have received from residents."

The firm has also announced names of four retailers set to go in the development's six independent retail units.

The let units are Timpson, Costa, Dyhouse Pharmacy and Reflections bathrooms and kitchens.

It won Solihull Metropolitan Borough Council permission to replace Forest Court with the development in 2011 with amended plans for a larger store in 2013.

The Dorridge Practice - which has been refurbished and expanded as part of the scheme - will re-open tomorrow (Monday, November 3).

West Midlands kitchen and bathrooms firm Reflections Studio tweeted: “Its official! Our new Solihull showroom opens in Dorridge 26th Nov.”

Sainsbury's will also hold a "try day" at Dorridge Village Hall on Saturday, November 15 from 11am to 3pm.

This is to meet staff and try food and drink which will be sold at the store.

What do you think? Leave your comments below. No registration required. Posts must abide by the terms and conditions. Report comments at news@thesilhillian.co.uk.
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73 comments:

  1. Can't wait for the store to open!!

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  2. great news, still have to decide on which shopping trolley to buy.

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  3. Whole site is far too big and has ruined the look of the village. Nothing to celebrate about this.

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  4. "ruined the look of the village", much nicer than forest court, and will be seen as a welcome amenity.

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  5. Excellent news cannot wait to shop there.

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  6. I will give it a try
    Hoppa 47litre folding lightweight shopping trolley shopping bag on wheels (Black F Design)
    Sold by Today's Home Bargains
    £16.50

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  7. I drove onto the car park for the first time today and I'm not convinced there are enough spaces?

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  8. So are they keeping to their local staff promise?

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  9. Don't worry Sainsbury can put second floor in for parking and tell us how lucky we are to have a beautiful ORANGE village.

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  10. Why not tarmac over the spinney ......what have Justin wants Justin gets.

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  11. Well 21.03 and 21.06
    The Spinney is nothing to do with Sainsbury's and is entirely safe.
    The construction of the store will not allow for a second floor to be added. The foundations could not support one.
    Justin King is no longer anything to do with Sainsbury's.
    If you have anything useful to say please post below.

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  12. just been up to the chemists, walked around the perimeter. Planting on Forest Road excellent. Will be wonderful, when the store opens.
    My only muttering is about the degree of slope for the car park, who is responsible for clearing snow and ice and salting the slope?

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  13. Well I would have preferred a more wood and glass construction and I think sainsbury's suggested something like this originally - but some people I spoke to were very against anything like that so we have ended up with the generic red brick. You can't please all the people all the time. Something had to be done there and it will provide a facility that will be used. Will be good to see it up and running and the workmaen gone.

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  14. "Good things come to those who wait" as a wise man once said.

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    1. Like King Canute?

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    2. Like we have had a choice! and you say that because you don´t live close to the Orange Monster

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  15. actually, Cnut, a Viking king, was very wise and a good leader. The tale of the tide has been misinterpreted and bu*****d, down history. What Cnut was trying to illustrate was the inability of Kings and men to stand in the way of God's hand. A good example of his wisdom.

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  16. Preferred the artist’s illustration of the clock with black hands but could have been worse, could have been orange!

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  17. what I will never understand is all those people who comment that they 'can't wait', who seem to have been desperately waiting for an enormous eyesore of a superstore to arrive on their doorsteps, ever came to live in Dorridge in the first place when it presumably didn't suit their personal preferences for an urbanised centre at all.
    well it does now so knock yourself out and have your fill if you can get a parking space.

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  18. eyesore was Forest Court.
    It is not a superstore, but a large supermarket

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    1. It was an eyesore because the council got so greedy with rents that the shops where forced to move somewhere else so who else could afford to pay the right amount of money for the place? and now we all have to suffer it. If you wanted a big supermarket you could have gone and live in Shirley or Solihull.

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  19. Ahh, I just love the funny comments people make on here, it's almost like an episode of Eastenders, so funny!

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  20. a store the size of Sainsburys Dorridge is classed as a superstore not a foodstore and not a convenience store. I think you'll see why this is when you step inside.

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  21. Look the terms 'superstore' 'foodstore' etc are just marketing terms. Not long ago Superstore was seen as a good thing with a bigger range of products. So saying 'Oh no its a superstore!!!' is a bit meaningless.

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  22. Not so long ago superstores were built in industrial parks, they didn't replace the village store...................

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  23. village store? Do you mean the fantastic spa we had in Forest Court??

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    1. It was some years ago but the time Forest Court was the busiest was when Manstyle ,used to have three units, had their sale. We also had a post office, a shoe shop, Dorridge Auto spares, butchers, greengrocer, bakers etc. All gone (a) possibly by greedy landlords the Muntz family, (b) by Tescos
      Monkspath. Now all coming back to bite us. Dorridge potentially heading the same way as Solihull "village".

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    2. To clarify the question was were the landlords possibly asking too much in rental charges given the changing nature of the market?

      Hindsight of course is a wonderful thing and all water under the bridge now.

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    3. Forest Court changed hands a couple of times and no owner was interested in sorting out Forest Court. Combine that with poorly managed Spar (empty shelves, old stock) and the bread shop lost contracts so went bust, so there was no footfall. You could watch the place die month on month. Shop owners complained of attempted rent increases and leases were short term so there was no point in investing - so previous owners of Forest Court always planned to do a redevelopment.

      As Paul from the bike shop said: Dorridge voted with its feet - they were the ones that didn't shop there and made the stores unviable. There may have been a bit of chicken and egg (the Post Office was well-frequented but Tesco were not interested in maintaining it), but Dorridge went to Tesco with enthusiasm. So given that is clearly what Dorridge want, they want supermarket shopping, it makes perfect sense to bring the supermarket here. Any bijou shop development would have been a pointless disaster, Knowle is teetering on the brink, and that has a good range of shops - poor access is strangling Knowle now.

      There was no Dorridge to kill, and at least we have something where there is a good chance that we will meet friends in our daily routine. It may need two or three years to see if something better than nail bars can establish themselves - it depends how canny the owners of Arden Buildings are.

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    4. I suspect Dorridge will vote with it's feet (or car wheels ) again. Sadly there is nothing of interest to encourage people to see Dorridge village as anything other than an oversized supermarket and a centre for the maintenance of teeth, hair, nails and tans.
      Heaven forbid I have to visit the supermarket on a daily basis and pretty sad if I have to go there to meet my friends or neighbours.
      To be honest, big Tesco will still be my shop of choice. Plenty of parking, a garden centre to enjoy nearby and a coffee at the nearby craft centre en route. Little Tesco will be fine should I need to shop any other time..

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  24. Village store???
    We had Bishops, a supermarket, nice meat counter if I recall, and International Stores in 1975, they were not a village store. Nearest village store is in Lapworth or Hockley heath

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  25. Please - the fact that Forest Court was thriving 30 years ago is TOTALLY IRRELEVANT!!
    30 years ago you could park on Solihull High Street and drive round Mell square, the Bull Ring was that hideous concrete monstrosity and moor street station didn't exist.The Berlin Wall was still up for goodness sake.
    Get a grip!

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  26. Just been to the barbers. walked around perimeter and across new car park. The plantings are superb on Forest Road. the narrow lanes and 20 mph limit will add much needed safety for pedestrians. Will the solitary telegraph pole remain, it is a bit of an eyesore on the new paved areas?

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  27. I look forward to shopping there. I agree with the previous comments about " harking back 30 years" there has to be progress, forest court was a very shabby dump and this development a vast improvement. Sadly we can't keep on being nimbys

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  28. yes I agree it's quite neat and tidy at the moment, although the litter is already starting to build up down Forest Road in the planting BUT if you had to put up with floodlights at high level shining into your bedrooms and keeping your kids awake you would be a nimby as well. this is all well and good if you don't live near it, but pretty awful for those closest and Forest Court didn't pose the same problems. we will just have to wait and see how difficult the traffic is around the centre.

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    1. I do not think anyone would disagree that Forest Court needed replacing. The argument is, and has always been, the size of the replacement! Something half the size would have caused much less debate.

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    2. I am sure everyone thought that Forest Court was wonderful when it first opened and it wouldn't have looked a dump when it was new. It needed replacing because it became neglected.
      I find the new development ugly and dominating and has completely changed the character of Dorridge. And yes, the car park lights are glaring and intrusive and as someone that lives close by I am dreading its opening and no I will not be shopping there.

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  29. Presumably you don't live in one of the properties that were built where fields once were ! Oh sorry,, that would be all of them, progress is such a bad thing. Would that we were all living in green fields and only eating only what we grew, in season of course, or caught in the fields and woods surrounding.

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  30. Well it will not be long now, before S-day. Just been up to the Chemists, the whole complex is really smart and will be a lift for Dorridge. They have turfed the corner of Dorridge Road and the Forest Road planting is excellent. My two worrries are that the units will not be viable, and the parking. Numberplate recognition cameras will be used to police the 2 hour limit. I was down in London last week and could not help but see the multi level car parks at many stations, Why not Dorridge?

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  31. oh for pity's sake. Dorridge is a village NOT London. If you like multi-storey car parks move to London move to Birmingham move to Solihull.
    Dorridge centre is absolutely awful, a cross between a semi-pedestrianised city centre and an industrial estate. people are already parking on the pavements because they are ludicrously big and in the loading bay. the council has sold us out to a bl..dy supermarket, it's such an awful shame. fluorescent lighting, twig trees and lots and lots of lorries and traffic. utterly disgusting I am ashamed to live here and will have to move as soon as I am able. I have no doubt that the pro-supermarket people will say good riddance. how to reduce a community to a collective of shoppers in one fell swoop.
    well done

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    1. 16;06 I agree and 20:24 I don't!

      Dorridge centre is far from perfect but surely looks far better than it did with a boarded up site (and before that a ghost one as no-one used Forest Court)? By definition there was, in fact, no "community" in the centre of Dorridge as not enough people went there to keep the previous site viable!

      On balance large pavements are surely better than large roads, especially given the number of school children, including young ones with parents, who pass through Dorridge.

      I think the "twig trees" are frankly quite large, and will continue to grow.

      As for Lorries, remember Evesons and the dirty coal ones that trundled through all day? ah no, I thought not.......

      Ps when you do move you will probably find your house has also increased in value with the new development.

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    2. I don't know how many lorries Evesons had but, I would be surprised if there were as many as a dozen, and they most certainly wre not trundling through all day any more than the Sainsbury's lorries will be doing

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    3. Do you have an alternative idea of regenerating the village then?

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    4. Haven't the Sainsbury's deliveries been capped?

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    5. 13.47 The 'village' was perfectly fine as it was. Forest Court simply needed modernising and for locals to support it. A bit of TLC would have gone a long way and would have meant we would still have had a village and not some horrible clone of every other dull and boring suburban shopping centre.
      I feel dreadfully sorry for all those living in the vicinity who can't help but be affected. Shame on those who forced this upon them without a care as to how their lives would change.
      As for the owl bench, it is a sad reminder that the Dorridge I loved has gone forever.

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    6. the owl bench I believe was once the aged and healthy oak tree. its like taking someone's healthy pet cat, killing it and giving it back stuffed as a present and expecting you to be grateful.
      great thanks I'm sure most of us would rather have had the oak tree

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    7. re. the oak tree.. 21.29. Well said, I feel exactly the same and would rather have the tree living and breathing any day.

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  32. well it seems some of us have got a memory block on HGVs and Dorridge.
    Remember, the deliveries to Bishops supermarket, the parking of wagons by International Stores ( Saleem Bagh), the delivery of cars to the sidings behind Poplar Road. Evesons was busy, with not only big HGV coal deliveries, but constant movement of oil tankers for domestic deliveries.
    Do not forget the very early milk tankers to the dairy on Mill Lane.

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    1. Well pointed out 10:41! Some people have very short memories, selective ones or just haven't lived in the village very long. We have been flattered by the lack of traffic through the village with the demise of the village centre. You can't have regeneration without an increase of traffic. Can't wait for our 'new' centre to open.

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    2. Crikey! All those years ago and it sounds worse than the Stratford Road Shirlley.

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  33. and also remember, that a saving grace is the low height of the railway bridge. Without this obstruction, any closure of the M42 between Solihull exit and M40, would lead to traffic off at Copt Heath, into Knowle, down Station road to Hockley Heath, then along Spring Lane to Redditch.

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  34. 20.24 I agree with you 100%.
    A supermarket does not a community make - not a community worth bothering with anyway.



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    1. Then reply to 20.24 and don't start a new thread!

      That's how these boards work plonker.

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    2. Is that all you have to contribute?

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  35. just been up to have a look. Really smart and a definite lift for Dorridge. Cannot wait to try Sainsburys, hooray no more Tescos at Monkspath.

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  36. Today is the last peaceful Sunday in Dorridge, enjoy.

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    1. 1313, I do not want a peaceful Sunday in Dorridge, I want it to be busy and buzzing with people enjoying the ambience, and meeting friends and neighbours and having a good goss. In fine weather the tables will be outside Costas, with the 20mph limit and the narrow lanes, it will be quieter except for people.

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    2. Why didn't you choose to live in Central Birmingham? The German Market sounds just up your street.

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    3. Rather than peaceful Dorridge why didn't you choose to live in Central Birmingham? This time of year the German Market sounds just up your street.

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    4. Ambience???? Are we thinking of the same place? I can't think of anything more depressing and sad than drinking coffee outside a supermarket entrance on a Sunday morning. Perhaps your post was tongue in cheek - I hope so. All the local car dealers might start parading their cars along the 20 mph narrow stretch of road you talk about they could just do the circuit over and over - they would certainly have a captive audience. Now there is an idea!!!

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    5. why the hell didnt you go to live in a city centre then and not in what WAS a sleepy village - at least on a Sunday and yes that means evesons too - they didn't operate on a Sunday!!

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    6. Sleepy = dead. Q.E.D.

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  37. I have lived around here all my life and I can remember all the lorries that others have mentioned and all the transporters going up Poplar Road, the only think that was different was the commuter parking, if we had had that the trucks would never have been able to go anywhere. As to the two level car park, is that not better than cars all over the place, they won't go away. I also remember the large Gas Tower that went up and down at Evesons, I wonder what the newbees would have made of that??

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  38. I agree with above - Commuter parking is the main issue for Dorridge at the moment - It's great that people use the train but they do need to be able to park. Two storey parking is the best solution as far as I can see.

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  39. The main issue for Dorridge is that it has too many people and has expanded past its ability to provide for them. If I lived near the current car parks I would not want them to become multi storey and have them looming over my home and garden, remember this is a residential area. Perhaps the station needs to be shifted out of the village centre to an area further down the track that has scope for plenty of parking. Very few villages/towns etc have the station as a focal point..As people say, things change and maybe it is time that the station develops a new identity as an information centre.village museum/arts and crafts workshops/ decent cafe - could really add to the village and add to the new development , an interesting place to visit and more of a focal meeting point than a supermarket cafe. The building would still be protected/preserved and enjoyed by everyone.

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  40. Sorry can never happen as it is all down to the Muntz family who gave the land for the station on condition that the London train stopped twice a day, so Mr. Muntz of Muntz Metals could travel to London. Just a bit of Dorridge history for you.

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  41. Yes, the only reason Dorridge is here is because Muntz wanted a station, so when he got it he then built a Hotel so people could stay, then people build expensive houses so they could also go to London, then he built shops for the houses etc. So really Dorridge started as a station and that is why it still is the focal point!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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  42. Perhaps someone should tell Sainsbury's and the council that!!!

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  43. I grew up in Dorridge and I know of its history, although I thought permssion was given for the railway to pass through the Muntz's land on the condition a London train stopped there, hence, the construction of station and hotel. However, I think the idea has some merit, in parts anyway.
    It is obvious Dorridge cannot cope with the number of commuters using the station so it is time to look outside the square and explore alternatives. A multi storey car park is totally inappropriate in a residential area such as Dorridge they would look hideous and industrial and very intrusive. Most of the 2 level popup carparks I have seen are not right next to family homes which they would be in Dorridge if the existing carparks are converted. The appearance of Dorridge station as our village's focal point would be ruined and overshadowed by one of these.
    Build a parkway station further along the track (towards Lapworth) for the bulk of the London trains, which would take care of the all day and longer parking. Maintain one return London journey per day at the existing station to fulfill the historical agreement and also maintain the local trains to Birmingham which start and terminate at Dorridge which would service the needs of those heading North. It has worked in Warwick, why not Dorridge.
    Ideally this wouldn't be necessary but Dorridge is bursting at the seams with new developments and with more housing on the cards it will only get worse - not better. Do not destroy the very character that attracts people to live in Dorridge.

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  44. Totally agree. Realistically it now, sadly,needs something like a Warwick Parkway, close to Dorridge, to alleviate the growing problems.

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